Posts Tagged ‘solar oven’

One of the rules or expressions among the preppers is “eat what you store and store what you eat.” Another sentiment is “practice is better than just reading,” which I totally agree with. With those two ideas in mind the Survival Mom challenges her readers to a monthly challenge or skill. January’s was to bake a loaf of bread from scratch.  

Last night I was talking with my old friend “J” who is quite the foodie, and has been trying all sorts of delicious baking experiments in the last couple of years.  She commented on how she had enjoyed my solar oven posts  because she is going to build a solar oven in order to bake bread in, which I think is awesome.  I told her about the Survival Mom’s challenge because there are (currently) 71 responses to her challenge and some of them would be quite useful for my friends goal.

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Last weekend, I built a solar over and tried to make sun-dried tomatoes in them.

Needed:

  • Two cardboard boxes, one slightly smaller than the other.
  • Aluminium foil.
  • A piece of glass or clear plastic. I used clear plastic because I figured for first attempt best to learn on something that does not break easy.
  • Glue.
  • A knife.
  • Old issues of the New Times, specifically the ads for the strip joints in the back, because this is going to get hot!
  • Some other stuff that will be obvious.

Step 1: Figure out the angle you want, generally 30% in summer and 70% in winter.

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Step 2: Cut larger box at that angle desired.  Fold flaps back and cover with tin-foil, the flatter the better.  Be generous with the glue at the edges.

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Step 3: Cut smaller box at same angle. Smaller box is to fit into larger box eventually.

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Step 4: Line inner box with tin-foil.

Step 5:  Place smaller box in larger box, use old New Times to insulate the oven by placeing crumbled snewspaper sheets between the boxes.

Step 6: Place box at angle to get sun, best if box is portable.  Cover box with clear plastic.

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Step 6: Watching a pot boil in the sun takes forever.

Lessons Learned

First time around I hit about 150″, it was about 70″ degrees outside. I cooked tomatoes and tried to boil water. Water never even came close to boiling, but would have made a nice tea.

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In four hours the tomatoes were slightly dried out but not dried out for preservation.

Temperature wise it did not seem to matter if I use glass or a sheet of clear plastic.  Some videos I had watched said they had gotten the temp. to 250 degrees, so I have a lot of room for improvement.   The glass was not flush with the box, so that is where I would begin working on improvements.