Posts Tagged ‘end of the world’

This weekend I will be in class on Friday night from 6 to 10, then 8 hours on Saturday and 8 hours on Sunday.  Sounds like fun, no?  I am taking a CERT class to learn how to help my community in the event of a national emergency.

The class sounds intense.  Not only is it a whole weekend dust in the wind, but we are covering the following……

  • Session I, DISASTER PREPAREDNESS:  hazards one can encounter and how familys should react before, during and after.
  • Session II, DISASTER FIRE SUPPRESSION:  Fire chemistry, hazardous materials, fire hazards, and fire suppression strategies.
  • Session III, DISASTER MEDICAL OPERATIONS PART I: Diagnosing and treating airway obstruction, bleeding, and shock by using simple triage and rapid treatment techniques.
  • Session IV, DISASTER MEDICAL OPERATIONS, PART II: Evaluating patients by doing a head to toe assessment, establishing a medical treatment area, performing basic first aid, and practicing in a safe and sanitary manner.
  • Session V, LIGHT SEARCH AND RESCUE OPERATIONS: Planning a rescue, including size-up, search techniques, rescue techniques, and most important, rescuer safety.
  • Session VI, DISASTER PSYCHOLOGY AND TEAM ORGANIZATION: Signs and symptoms that might be experienced by the disaster victim and worker.
    Session VII, COURSE REVIEW AND DISASTER SIMULATION
I did find it ironic that I had to sign up for the class by filling out a paper form in pen and mailing in my form by snail mail.
Below:  I hope the end of the world happens during the AZ State Fair.

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Neil Strauss has already wandered deep down the rabbit hole I am currently exploring.  Many of the same conclusions I am reaching (for example how we are more likely to help rather than hurt each other when the SHTF)  are chapters in his book, Emergency: This Book will save your life.  While I have been exploring what one would need to know when society crumbles for the last 4 months, he spent 3 years doing this and wrote a book when he was finished.

If one is looking for a practical “How to guide” for surviving the end of the days then this book is not for you, perhaps How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It: Tactics, Techniques, and Technologies for Uncertain Times is a better choice for that.   But if one is looking for a journal of how goes about learning how to prepare or one wants to reflect on the lessons learned while prepping then this is a book worth reading.

Since reading it I have caught myself a couple of times thinking when blogging “Is this my observation or Strauss’s?”    He killed a goat, learned how to make a knife, was instructed on how to respond to a disaster, cooked a fish and survived a wet night in the woods.  However, these things he did are not as valuable to the reader as his reflections of what conclusions one reaches when one does these things.  For that reason, if nothing else, it is worth reading.

In the meantime, I am going to take a least one of his specific recommendations, which is to take a CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) class.

One of the sacred rules of the preppers is “Store what you eat, eat what you store.”  My fridge is currently empty on purpose.  I am going to see if I can buy exactly what would last me two weeks.  In two weeks I go to New York City (NYC) for four days and two days in Pennsylvania (PA).  I wonder how close I can time exactly two weeks of food.

On a side note, NYC is seen by most of the preppers, survivalists, naturalists, and hollywoodites as the worst place to be during the Apocalypse.  I am visiting my brother and his wife so I hope that the doomsayers are all wrong. Some may argue I have joined the doomsayers by my actions.   I hope my work is in vain (not really, I like having a garden and the forced domestication.)  In short, some might say I hope I am wrong.

I do.   It’s funny.  Spending so much energy on something you hope doesn’t happen.  It hints at unfulfilled frustration and laughing at yourself.  I suppose that is what attracts me to thinking about the end of the world as we know it.  I like dark humor.  Laughing at life while life ends just seems funny.  This is probably why we are attracted to the Joker.  And by “we” I mean me.

Below:  Photo taken during my last visit to NYC to see my brother.   We went to one of only two shooting galleries in the city for his bachelor party.

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As Alan Weisman demonstrates in The World Without Us, no one really knows what animals will thrive after we pesky humans are gone. I figure if one knows how to deal with a bear then you would hopefully be OK with any other wild animals. The presentation is the result of watching multiple videos on you tube.


 

You know the scene from many  a movie.  The giant spaceship erupts the sky,  the gigantic wall of molten lava speeds towards you, or you watch a giant mushroom cloud raid neon green droplets.  You know the end is immediate so you might as well watch the last few fireworks.

For a song to make it to a list to play at this profound moment would take something special; a little joy, a little sadness, and a little bit of hope.

My current list.

1. I saw her standing her there by The Beatles sample lyric “No I will never dance with another”. Best if you are with a loved one.

2. Ramblin Man by the Allman Brothers. Because that is what we the survivors are about to embark on, a long ramble.

3. Something by CCR because anything by them is also good for ramblin.

4. All along the Watch Tower by Jimi Hendrix For all the obvious reasons.

5. Stuck in the Middle with You by Steelers Wheel because it makes one happy to be surrounded by madness.

6. Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This) by the Eurythmics because it has got a great sense of sur-realism and stubbordness.

7. It’s the End of the World (And I Feel Fine) by R.E.M. because it is too glaring a choice to not include, plus it is the perfect song to dance on everyone’s graves to.

8.  Revolution by the Beatles a joyous song about things falling apart.

As noted in previous posts, I have been brainstorming through what would be the places that folks would be less likely to think of to raid but would have useful stuff none-the-less.

I think pharmacies could be at the top of the list.  However I bet anyone who has to take medicine for one reason or another might also think of this as well, but would they by-definition be a little easier to defeat in a struggle?

Pharmacies have lots of pills for lots of different aliments. Pills are easy to carry. So would pills would be good thinks to negotiate with. But what beyond antibiotics would be good to gather?

Off to the internet!

The Hesperian group has a pdf copy of their book Where There Is No Doctor. This book’s goal is provide communities with instructions on how to provide medical care in third world situations, would be useful in the apocalypse as well.  Particularly Chapter 6, “Right and Wrong Uses of Modern Medicines.” “green pages” which is their list of “The Uses, Dosage, and Precautions for Medicines” mentioned throughout the 504 page long book.

Also worth printing out before the grid finally collapses is the World Health Organizations list of essential medicines.  They list about 200. But it has a whole bunch of terms (such as “Antianginal medicines” that I am not sure what they mean.  On a side note,  getting someone who had served in Doctors without Borders would be a good member for one’s tribe.

So raid the pharmacy, grab whatever you can, and get home and study the list, of course you won’t be able to google the terms after Armageddon.

When discussing the apocalypse and how one would respond, people always ask the details of the apocalypse; they want to know if it was nuclear, or electronic, or viral, from an asteroid, from space, or just zombies.   I wonder if it really even matters. “End of the civilization” seems obvious to me.

But then I think about it. One man’s end of the world might be radically different from another man’s imagination.   (Which raises a separate question-post. How many would have to die for there to be  an end to society or law? I am guessing only a third, transportation would break down first. )

So let’s go to the neutral source. As of Dec 17, 2010 Wikipedia’s first line for apocalypse said  “An Apocalypse is a disclosure of something hidden from the majority of mankind in an era dominated by falsehood and misconception, i.e. the veil to be lifted.”  And what does that even mean?