Posts Tagged ‘2012’

Between the trip to NYC last week and participating in the Phoenix Fringe Festival for the next two weekends I have been a little light on the postings. 

Ernesto Moncada wrote and is directing the Arcana Collective in an experimental theatre performance that “embarks you on a captivating journey through underground ceremonies and shadowy thresholds.”  Ernesto wrote into the piece a character named “Apocalypse Man.”  Guess who he had in mind for the role?  My character shows the audience “why the Apocalypse is just another chaotic epiphany organized by romantic phantoms” whatever that means.

We have 5 performances in the next two weeks and I have been concentrating on remembering my parts. 

In the meantime, how about a video?

Below is Ashley Naftule and Kevin Flanagan doing a bit they did for Space 55’s 7 minutes in heaven show.   It is a relevant video for this post as Ashley is also performing in the Fringe Festival and in the video, Ashley and Kevin perform what is most likely NOT going to be the cause of the Apocalypse.

Most unlikely cause of the apocalypse from son of patter on Vimeo.

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Before leaving for 9 days I asked my neighbor to water my garden once while I was gone. I can tell from the exact position where I left the hose that he did not. Despite that everything (except the gopher attacked agave) looks good. In fact, I am glad the garden did not get any grid-fed water for a week. The plants look healthier than when I left, which leads me to think I was over-watering, which is bad for two reasons, 1: Overwatering is bad and 2: Overwatering will be near impossible when the grid falls.  By then I should have an idea of how to grow with the least water possible.
The plants I am growing all have been specifically selected because they are Southwest friendly, meaning they don’t need a lot of water (for example, like celery would.) I have planted bush beans, pole beans, winter squash, summer squash, tomatillos, and habanero peppers.The return of seeds and/or seedlings producing actual plants though seems very low. The first batch of seeds went into the ground on Feb 22. I then planted another round three weeks later, thinking I don’t want all the veggies to come in at once.
I seem to be getting about 2 plants for every 10 or so seeds planted. I am not sure why the low yield.

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Above: From Front to Back, tomatillo, bush beans, summer squash, more bush beans, and winter squash. About 12 sees planted to each row, but each row is only producing 2 to 3 plants each, but those plants look strong.

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Above: I have had no luck with the Habanero peppers, not even a single weed, much less an actual wanted plant has grown in the elevated garden. The elevated garden was made from a discarded baby bed I found in the alleyway. I think my mix of manure, compost, and soil in the backyard has too much of the backyard soil.

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Above: On a positive note, the Blue Palo Verde I planted a week and have ago seems to have survivied the shock of transplanting.

One of the rules or expressions among the preppers is “eat what you store and store what you eat.”  Another sentiment is “practice is better than just reading,” which I totally agree with.  With those two sentiments in mind the Survival Mom is challenging her readers this month to cook rice and beans seven days in a row.

So, I bought some dried black beans (instead of the canned ones) to see what I could do with them.  I soaked them for three and a half days, instead of overnight, because I read somewhere that will help cut down on the cooking time, which will be helpful when wood is scarce.   I did replace the water they were soaking in every day.  The water would be dyed a little less black with each replacement of water.

Soaking them so long led to a funky smell, and some scum-like stuff floating on the top of the water.  I am not sure if this would make them unsafe to eat.    An internet search gives a unclonclusive answer.

Some say that I have fermented the beans and this is good, because it makes it easier to digest the nutrients while others say that I should throw them out.

I ate them.  They tasted very bland.

Lesson learned: Stockpile spices for the apocalypse.  Because who doesn’t like a little flavor once life has become dreary!

One of the sacred rules of the preppers is “Store what you eat, eat what you store.”  My fridge is currently empty on purpose.  I am going to see if I can buy exactly what would last me two weeks.  In two weeks I go to New York City (NYC) for four days and two days in Pennsylvania (PA).  I wonder how close I can time exactly two weeks of food.

On a side note, NYC is seen by most of the preppers, survivalists, naturalists, and hollywoodites as the worst place to be during the Apocalypse.  I am visiting my brother and his wife so I hope that the doomsayers are all wrong. Some may argue I have joined the doomsayers by my actions.   I hope my work is in vain (not really, I like having a garden and the forced domestication.)  In short, some might say I hope I am wrong.

I do.   It’s funny.  Spending so much energy on something you hope doesn’t happen.  It hints at unfulfilled frustration and laughing at yourself.  I suppose that is what attracts me to thinking about the end of the world as we know it.  I like dark humor.  Laughing at life while life ends just seems funny.  This is probably why we are attracted to the Joker.  And by “we” I mean me.

Below:  Photo taken during my last visit to NYC to see my brother.   We went to one of only two shooting galleries in the city for his bachelor party.

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The Screaming Lady, one of the Firehouse icons

We will all live in communes once society shits itself out. It is only natural. No person can live alone when resources are thin. There is simply too much to do if one wants to learn and do all the chores. You will need help for society to progress.

What does it take to live in a commune? The closest thing I have experienced is the FireHouse Sunday night House meetings. At the Firehouse 7 to 8 artists live in an old office space.  They have a stage and a coffee cart out back and a gallery up front.  There is always something happening at the Firehouse.   Every Sunday night the residents get together to discuss house issues and share a meal.   I have said for years that the best show in downtown Phoenix is the Sunday night house meetings. The reason I say this is because the best show anywhere should give you something to think about.

I used to attend them even though I was not a resident. Only residents, and people who have a legitimate reason to be there should/are allowed to attend. I took friends, because I thought they could learn something. But one of the residents finally told me, “Kevin, I don’t mind if you come but quit bringing guests, we are not doing this for people’s entertainment.” He was right.

The FireHouse told me all I know about living in a commune, but I don’t know much because I have only been an observer and not a resident.   That said, here is what I learned from watching the FireHouse and being a initiated Thought Criminal:

  • Rule 1a: Some people do not like to have their pain displayed on stage.
  • Rule 1b: Someone needs to do the dishes.
  • Rule 2: It is good to have a large common calendar present.
  • Rule 3: When people are talking it out, it is necessary to have patience and listen. This is much harder than one might think it to be.
  • Rule 4: When speaking try to be precise. Try not to bring up sidebars to illustrate a point.
  • Rule 5:  If one does not have a plan for the Post-Apocalypse, a decent plan would be to find Michael & Joanna 23 and stick with them.  Not only do they know how to raise a child, tend a garden, run a light show, and repair an old building; they also know how to get a large group of people to work together and get something done with marginal resources.   That is what will separate one tribe over another after the Apocalypse.

Below: Video Tour of the Firehouse during a 3rd Friday Firestage show.

As Alan Weisman demonstrates in The World Without Us, no one really knows what animals will thrive after we pesky humans are gone. I figure if one knows how to deal with a bear then you would hopefully be OK with any other wild animals. The presentation is the result of watching multiple videos on you tube.


 

Thank you Phil Freedom for putting the following in the Conspire Community Calendar.

With our well known Achilles Heel, lack of water, Phoenix gets a bad rap when people are discussing post-Apocalyptic hang-out spots.  But, Phoenix has got a lot going for it.

First, you are not likely freeze to death. Here in the desert we forgot how a constant cold blast makes it hard to live.  When we are all riding motorcycles around in our underwear, the constant sun will be a blessing.

Second, a betting man might say the most likely Great Cataclysm is global warming.  It is also the most likely to be the slowest, even slower than an Al Gore lecture. California and the East Coast are screwed. The problem will be too much water.  I hate to get all Lex Luthor but I wouldn’t mind if California falls into the ocean. Personally, I hope the tropics move north and we have beach volley-ball all the way to Tucson.

This leads us to the third reason, the water issue. Hopefully, this won’t be the problem, see second reason. Yet if it is, I don’t think it will be as bad as people make. This city was founded on canals, and supported 20,000 people. Now, if the 4 million that are currently here, stay alive and here, then we are fucked.

Fourth, people with real skills will be hanging out on 5th street. We got people who can fix bikes, makes clothes and grow plants here. And three skills are better than none.

Kevin Patterson