Archive for the ‘building’ Category

A report on what the Pueblo Ruins look like has already been commented on in a previous post.  This post is more about getting to the ruins and comments on the surrounding area.

The ruins I went to 7 years ago were NOT Pueblo Canyon, they were the appropriately named Devil’s Chasm Ruins.  The two sets of ruins are relatively close to each other (I would need to consult a topo map to determine how far, but the drive to the head of each trail is 2.9 miles apart.)  Devil’s Chasm is a much more difficult, even though a shorter hike.

We met a Park Ranger in the ruins and spoke with him for a while.  He mentioned another set of ruins called Cold Spring Ruins, which is his favorite, but according to the Ranger they are hard to find and many people don’t find them.   The fact that there are separate awesome places for a post-apocalypse desert bunker so close to together emphasizes how the area is a decent place to start rebuilding.

The drive in is around 24 miles down a dirt road off of HWY188 (the road between Globe and Roosevelt Lake).   On the dirt road you cross a river three times.  The fact there is such easy water to find in the area is awesome.  You pass (I think) two ranches and multiple cow pens.  I would assume the family’s that live in these two ranches are a hearty bunch.

Below: Crossing a river on the drive in.
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Despite the fact you cross the river three times I think my Honda civic could make it the first 20.5 miles.  However, I am not sure what the parking would be like.  The last 4 miles on most definitely needs 4WD, even better if you have high-clearance.    Here is the link to what I thought were the best directions to Pueblo Canyon.

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Thank you Tommy Cannon for showing me how!

The last temporary visit of the local library yielded some useful videos on how to prepare for Humanity’s waterloo.

There were two decent videos on how to build an enviromental house.  From what I have seen so far, the community of people preparing for civilization’s curtains tend to be a conservative bunch.  One place where the preppers and the far left overlaps is Extreme Pro-Green Building. After all, surviving on your own is the goal of both groups. And I tend to like it when extremes meet.

Back to point of this post, the library had two decent videos on how to build green, a lot of the techniques might be good to know once the giant wire spider stops giving us it’s venom. They were a good start for me on how to approach the learning construction task. I really have trouble with hammers.

Building with awareness the construction of a hybrid home is a good overview of the considersations one might consider.

Building Green Hosted by Kevin Contreras goes into much more detail.  With four discs he walks through multiple aspects of building green during all stages on construction.

Last weekend, I built a solar over and tried to make sun-dried tomatoes in them.

Needed:

  • Two cardboard boxes, one slightly smaller than the other.
  • Aluminium foil.
  • A piece of glass or clear plastic. I used clear plastic because I figured for first attempt best to learn on something that does not break easy.
  • Glue.
  • A knife.
  • Old issues of the New Times, specifically the ads for the strip joints in the back, because this is going to get hot!
  • Some other stuff that will be obvious.

Step 1: Figure out the angle you want, generally 30% in summer and 70% in winter.

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Step 2: Cut larger box at that angle desired.  Fold flaps back and cover with tin-foil, the flatter the better.  Be generous with the glue at the edges.

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Step 3: Cut smaller box at same angle. Smaller box is to fit into larger box eventually.

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Step 4: Line inner box with tin-foil.

Step 5:  Place smaller box in larger box, use old New Times to insulate the oven by placeing crumbled snewspaper sheets between the boxes.

Step 6: Place box at angle to get sun, best if box is portable.  Cover box with clear plastic.

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Step 6: Watching a pot boil in the sun takes forever.

Lessons Learned

First time around I hit about 150″, it was about 70″ degrees outside. I cooked tomatoes and tried to boil water. Water never even came close to boiling, but would have made a nice tea.

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In four hours the tomatoes were slightly dried out but not dried out for preservation.

Temperature wise it did not seem to matter if I use glass or a sheet of clear plastic.  Some videos I had watched said they had gotten the temp. to 250 degrees, so I have a lot of room for improvement.   The glass was not flush with the box, so that is where I would begin working on improvements.

On the list of places one might be able to raid without too much trouble is the large big box Hardware stores. I assume after all of society burns down we all will have to build again at some point.

Some would obvioulsy already have these tools in their workroom. I probably don’t. While doing tasks as simple as building a ladder and changing out my garbage disposal I have learned not only do I have very few tools, but I am not entirely familiar with the few that I have.

So I need to consult an expert on this. To get me started I have been skimming through the Reader’s Digest: Complete Do-it-yourself Manual Circa 1973. I found it in a used bookshop.

What I like about it, is it has a list of the “Job to be done” with a corresponding “Appropriate Hand Tools” column and a corresponding “Useful Power Tools” column. I assume I can ignore the “Useful Power Tools” column. Power Tools, as a rule, are heavy and also need power. Which I assume we won’t have much after the power plants all implode.

Here are some of the tasks and the corresponding tools. I have selected the tasks one should be able to do to build a basic fortification and shelter, without use of the Grid.

Installing a door
chisel
gauge
hammer
drill
awl
plane
screwdriver

Installing a door lock
brace
drill
chisel
hammer
screwdriver
awl

Securing loose brick
cold chisel
hammer
mortar (Sidenote: Can one build their own mortar?)
whiskbroom (Which I am sure one could build themself.)

Repairing rotted clapboard
saw
chisel
hammer
nail set
pry bar
paint and brush

What is not in the book, is how to build a fence. That is worth learning as well.

Next step would become familiar with these tools and look for opportunites to use them around the house.