Archive for the ‘fallout library’ Category

Neil Strauss has already wandered deep down the rabbit hole I am currently exploring.  Many of the same conclusions I am reaching (for example how we are more likely to help rather than hurt each other when the SHTF)  are chapters in his book, Emergency: This Book will save your life.  While I have been exploring what one would need to know when society crumbles for the last 4 months, he spent 3 years doing this and wrote a book when he was finished.

If one is looking for a practical “How to guide” for surviving the end of the days then this book is not for you, perhaps How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It: Tactics, Techniques, and Technologies for Uncertain Times is a better choice for that.   But if one is looking for a journal of how goes about learning how to prepare or one wants to reflect on the lessons learned while prepping then this is a book worth reading.

Since reading it I have caught myself a couple of times thinking when blogging “Is this my observation or Strauss’s?”    He killed a goat, learned how to make a knife, was instructed on how to respond to a disaster, cooked a fish and survived a wet night in the woods.  However, these things he did are not as valuable to the reader as his reflections of what conclusions one reaches when one does these things.  For that reason, if nothing else, it is worth reading.

In the meantime, I am going to take a least one of his specific recommendations, which is to take a CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) class.

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I been reading Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times by Steve Solomon and frankly it just overwhelms me. 

After reading the watering section I am not sure if he is telling me to water more or water less.  I suppose one needs a little bit of a mathematical mind to follow his recommendations,  maybe having a mathematical mind is part of  a green thumb?     I wasn’t sure what he was talking about in the watering section, much less the composting or fertigation sections.

I believe my soil in Phoenix is Clay, and he doesn’t seem to think it is worth growing in clay.  This makes me sad.  The reviews on Amazon.com for the book are mixed, some feel as I do, while others strongly recommend reading the book a second time in order to get everything to sink in. 

I did like the idea of making a compost-tea and then use a drip method on the plants.   That might be a good project for the weekend.

Below: A less-than succesful experiment of using an old pallet to make a slightly raised bed.

gunsandgardens 023

Fall Out Library

Posted: February 19, 2011 in books, fallout library

The books I currently would most like to add to my Fall Out Library.

Reader’s digest “Back to basics” the older the edition the better.

The SAS survival manual

How to Survive the End of the World as We Know It: Tactics, Techniques, and Technologies for Uncertain Times by James Wesley Rawles

Where There Is No Doctor: A Village Health Care Handbook by David Werner

Tappan on Survival by Mel Tappan (considered the “Classic” of this genre

Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times by Steve Solomon

Books are heavy. Libraries are worth having. At some point after society breaks down I will probably most have likely to wander at some point and carry all of my shit.  Again books are heavy. To be willing to sacrifice the energy needed to carry it’s weight the book better include some useful knowledge and a lot of it.

From my current bookshelf I only think I got two books that could meet that criteria. One because it is lightweight. One because of the content per ounce.

First, is the “Marine Battle Skills Training Handbook: Individual Combat Basic Tasks”. Best book to have in a pinch. Hands down. At some point one better be prepared to kill after the apocalypse. Just don’t practice the skills too late.

Second is by Paul Tawrell, Camping and Wilderness Survival. It is a bit thick and heavy, when considering whether it is worth its weight in water or dried beans. But it has how to trap an animal for every sort of climate on planet earth. Which is useful , because one does not know what the weather will be like after millions have died. It could be colder or maybe hotter. My guess is on colder.

After extensive internet searching it looks like the next book I should study is Emergency: This Book Will Save Your life to pick up some skills. Even though the author, Neil Strauss is seen as a sleazeball by some because of his other books of how to pick up some skills.

Also recommended by friends is Reader’s Digest: Back to Basics, which I have their construction book and I like it.  Very clear and straight.  This looks like a good solid book.

Above: Not a useful book for the Apocalypse.